Tag Archives: James Tissot

Images for the Third Sunday after Epiphany

The Calling of the Disciples from Matthew’s Gospel

The Calling of the Apostles, Mosaics from San Marco, Santa Maria Assunta in Torcello and Murano

The Calling of the Apostles, Mosaics from San Marco, Santa Maria Assunta in Torcello and Murano

Apostle's Call, Relief from Manastery of San Pedro da Roda

Apostle’s Call, Relief from Manastery of San Pedro da Roda

 

Calling of Peter and Andrew, Duccio di Buonisegna (1308-1311)

Calling of Peter and Andrew, Duccio di Buonisegna (1308-1311)

 

James Tissot, The Calling of Saint Peter and Saint Andrew (1886-1894)

James Tissot, The Calling of Saint Peter and Saint Andrew (1886-1894)

 

Images for the Fourth Sunday of Advent

Another cool resource I found this week for artwork is Art and Bible which is in French, but it is pretty easy to click on the wikis for various readings which also has some great artwork for this passage.

For this year it is Matthew’s nativity story which focuses attention on Joseph and the angel speaking to Joseph in a dream:

Saint Joseph the Carpenter, Georges de La Tour (1640)

Saint Joseph the Carpenter, Georges de La Tour (1640)

James Tissot, The Vision of Saint Joseph (1886-1894)

James Tissot, The Vision of Saint Joseph (1886-1894)

T'oros Roslin, Joseph's Dream (1262)

T’oros Roslin, Joseph’s Dream (1262)

Domenico Guidi, Vision of St. Joseph 1694

Domenico Guidi, Vision of St. Joseph 1694

Sir John Everett Millais, Jesus in the House With His Elders, 1850

Sir John Everett Millais, Jesus in the House With His Elders, 1850

Saint Joseph Holding the Christ, Scuola Veneta, picture by Antione Motte dit Falisse

Saint Joseph Holding the Christ, Scuola Veneta, picture by Antione Motte dit Falisse

Images for the Third Sunday of Advent

This is typically the second Sunday of John the Baptist readings for the season of Advent, so a few images of John the Baptist first and then I’m going to  break from the Revised Common Lectionary this Sunday in Year A (Matthew) and use the genealogy in Matthew’s gospel as a way to introduce the story. So John the Baptist first, as I mentioned last week John the Baptist is a favorite of artists so there are lots more out there, but a few include:

Joan de Joanes, Saint John the Baptist, 1560

Joan de Joanes, Saint John the Baptist, 1560

John the Baptist, Icon from Macedonia 14th Century

John the Baptist, Icon from Macedonia 14th Century

Pierre Puvis de Chavannes, The Beheading of St John the Baptist 1869

Pierre Puvis de Chavannes, The Beheading of St John the Baptist 1869

Now for the Geneology of Matthew which is punctuated (unusual for a geneology) by a number of women including

Tamar:

Horace Vernet, Judah and Tamar 1840

Horace Vernet, Judah and Tamar 1840

Rahab:

James Tissot, The Harlot of Jericho and the Two Spies

James Tissot, The Harlot of Jericho and the Two Spies

Ruth

William Blake, Naomi Entreating Ruth and Orpah

William Blake, Naomi Entreating Ruth and Orpah

Bathsheeba, the wife of Uriah the Hittite

Artemisia Gentileschi, Bathshedba, first half of the 17th Century

Artemisia Gentileschi, Bathshedba, first half of the 17th Century

The good kings of Israel and later Judah and the bad:

King Josiah by Julius Schnoor von Carolseld

King Josiah by Julius Schnoor von Carolseld

The Exile in Babylon

James Tissot, The Flight of the Prisoners

James Tissot, The Flight of the Prisoners

And the return

Nehemiah View the Ruins of jerusalem's Walls, Gustav Dore 1866

Nehemiah View the Ruins of jerusalem’s Walls, Gustav Dore 1866

And finally Joseph

Guido Reni, Saint Joseph with the Infant Jesus, 1635

Guido Reni, Saint Joseph with the Infant Jesus, 1635

Images for the 26th Sunday After Pentecost (Lectionary 33C)

The primary text this week is Jesus talking about the destruction of the Temple, so there are a number of good temple related images:

The Temple by Radojavor@deviantart.com

The Temple by Radojavor@deviantart.com

Model of the Second Temple at the time of Jesus

Model of the Second Temple at the time of Jesus

James Tissot, Reconstruction of Jerusalem and the Temple of Herod, painted between 1886 and 1894

James Tissot, Reconstruction of Jerusalem and the Temple of Herod, painted between 1886 and 1894

The Disciples Admire the Buildings of the Temple, James Tissot

The Disciples Admire the Buildings of the Temple, James Tissot

The Siege and Destruction of Jerusalem by Romans Under the Command of Titus, A.D. 70 by David Roberts 1850

The Siege and Destruction of Jerusalem by Romans Under the Command of Titus, A.D. 70 by David Roberts 1850

 

 

 

Images for 25th Sunday after Pentecost- Lectionary 32C

This is the confrontation between Jesus and the Sadducees in Luke 20: 27-40, Job19: 23-27 and 2 Thessalonians 2: 1-5, 13-17

Before I get into specific Sunday there is a really cool link to the Wikipedia Commons for James Tissot’s Paintings of the Life of Christ, roughly 436 paintings from various scenes.

Job (oil on canvas) by Bonnat, Leon Joseph Florentin (1833-1922)

Job (oil on canvas) by Bonnat, Leon Joseph Florentin (1833-1922)

1394146_483357285112583_1050708757_nFor a little fun from United Methodist Memes

James Tissot, Annas and Ciaphas (between 1886-1894)

James Tissot, Annas and Ciaphas (between 1886-1894)

James Tissot, The Chief Priests Take Counsel Together (1886-1894)

James Tissot, The Chief Priests Take Counsel Together (1886-1894)

 

Ezekiel's Vision: Resurrection of the Dead, Synagogue interior wood panel Dura Europos, Syria

Ezekiel’s Vision: Resurrection of the Dead, Synagogue interior wood panel Dura Europos, Syria

Luca Signorelli, Resurrection of the Flesh (1499-1502)

Luca Signorelli, Resurrection of the Flesh (1499-1502)